Mullein Herb Medicine and Warding Off Evil

mullein

I am picking Mullein this week nearing the New Moon and Summer Solstice, and drying it to make some tea for my detox purification that I am doing for three months. I have never had sinus until the US Air Force started spraying (chemtrails) about 8 years ago pretty heavily. When they spray I do get some sinus blockage, and it seems Mullein breaks it up and of course that is good for my body. I have a Tea Recipe, Spray for those with (asthma) and general information I found around the web…

The large flowering stems of Mullein were dried by the ancient cultures and dipped in tallow, and then used as a lamp wick or for a torch. These torches were said to ward off evil spirits and witches, although witches had these in their herbal gardens and were not the bad guys. For those interested in a ‘tallow’ recipe, I put the link at the bottom.

The name mullein comes from the Latin word mollis, meaning soft, referring to the plant’s woolly stem and leaves. A couple of folk names for mullein have more intriguing associations. “Candlewick plant” refers to the old practice of using the dried down of mullein leaves and stems to make lamp wicks. Mullein stems were dipped in tallow to make torches either used by witches or used to repel them, hence the name “hag taper.”  The custom of using mullein for torches dates back at least to Roman times.

Frazier writes in the Golden Bough that mullein was added to the bonfire on Midsummer’s eve celebrations to ward away evil. Some ancient magical grimoires have been found to list powdered mullein leaf as a substitute for graveyard dust when that was unavailable. “Jacob’s staff,” “Jupiter’s staff” and “Aaron’s rod” all have been used as names for the tall flower stalks. The plant’s soft leaves also are known commonly as “bunny’s ears” and “flannel leaf.

~ Phoenix

Mullein – Known as Verbascum thapsus, its Latin name, Mullein is considered beneficial for the lungs because it is an expectorant. This means that the herb helps the body remove excess mucus from lungs and soothes the mucus membranes with its emollient properties. Good for bronchitis, heavy coughing, chest colds and even asthma.

Mullein is a common all over but this plant is much more than a bit of roadside greenery, as it holds the cures for several common conditions within it its fuzzy, pale green leaves and yellow rosettes. Still used by Native Americans and Herbalists because of its proven, beneficial effects on the respiratory system. Curing common ailments such as coughing, lung weakness, respiratory constriction and chest colds, the mullein plant is truly a lung healing herb.

mullein silverBoth leaves and the flowers of the plant contain saponins, a natural detergents which make a cough more productive in releasing and expelling phlegm from the walls of the lings, and mucilage, a gelatinous substance which soothes any irritated membrane.

Dried mullein leaves, flowers and roots can all be used to heal these lung abating conditions. A mullein tea is the most common method of preparing the herb and the recipe below makes one cup of tea, which can be consumed up to 3 times a day. Gargling the tea once it has cooled down is also very effective for coughing and soreness of the throat.

Also, Mullein extract infused with olive oil has been used to reduce the inflammation of earaches, sore joints, insect bites and hemorrhoids because of its soothing properties. Simple poultices made out of fresh, mashed mullein leaves and flowers mixed with water can also be used to relieve, burns, boils and sores.

Mullein Tea

Ingredients…
1 ½ cups boiling water
1-2 teaspoons dried mullein
leaves and/or flowers (flowers make
a sweeter tea)
1 teaspoon dried spearmint
(optional for flavor)
1-2 teaspoons honey (optional)

Method

Steep the mullein leaves in hot water inside a tea ball or strainer for 15 minutes. If the flavor of mullein doesn’t agree with you, add some honey a spearmint or lemon mint.

For those with asthma, make an inhalant. To do this, boil the leaves in water for 5 minutes and inhale the steam to relieve coughs, congestion and asthma. Mullein can fight asthma and keep away colds because it actually prevents infections from settling into the delicate respiratory tissue by curing dryness and constriction. Rather ironically, mullein can also be smoked, thus rendering itself the only type of cigarette that could be considered beneficial in treating lung conditions.

Mullein is primarily a respiratory herb, although its benefits reach much further than our lungs. The herb is a diuretic and thus can relieve urinary tract inflammation when taken through a tea. It can also be used to decrease inflammation in the bowels, helping to reduce colitis and other issues.

Source: Mullin information from http://www.motherearthliving.com and http://www.organicauthority.com and Tallow is at: http://www.paleoplan.com/2011/12-02/make-your-own-tallow/

Source: Mullein Herb Medicine and Warding Off Evil

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